How to Hold Table Tennis Racket

Table tennis, also known as ping-pong, is a fun and easy game to play. The object of the game is to hit the small, white ball back and forth across the table using paddles. To be successful at table tennis, it is important to hold the racket properly.

Here are some tips on how to hold a table tennis racket: The most important part of holding a table tennis racket is gripping it correctly. The grip should be firm but not too tight.

Place your index finger and middle finger behind the paddle and wrap your ring finger and pinky around the side of the paddle. Your thumb should be placed on top of the paddle. Experiment with different grips until you find one that feels comfortable for you.

When hitting the ball, use your wrist to snap your hand forward and make contact with the ball at the bottom of your swing. This will give you more control over where you hit the ball and how much power you put into your shot.

  • Pick up the racket in your dominant hand
  • Place your other hand on the back of the racket head
  • Grip the racket with your fingers, not your palm
  • Rest the racket head on your palm and hold it lightly

How to Do Shakehand Grip in Table Tennis

Shakehand grip is the most popular grip in table tennis. It is named after the way you hold the racket, which is similar to shaking hands with someone. This grip gives you more control over the racket and allows you to generate more power.

To do shakehand grip, start by holding the racket in your dominant hand. Place your thumb and first two fingers on the back of the racket. Then, place your remaining fingers underneath the racket.

Make sure that your palm is not touching the surface of the table. Now it’s time to position your other hand. Start by placing your index finger on top of the rubber at a 45-degree angle.

Your thumb should be next to your index finger, and your remaining fingers should be underneath the racket just like your dominant hand. Again, make sure that your palm is not touching the table. You’re now ready to play!

Experiment with different grips and strokes to find what works best for you.

What are the 2 Kinds of Grip in Table Tennis?

There are two main types of grip in table tennis: the shakehands grip and the penhold grip. The shakehands grip is named after the way you hold the racket, with your palm and fingers wrapped around the handle. This is the most common type of grip and it gives you a lot of control over your shots.

The penhold grip is named after the way you hold the racket, with your index finger and thumb extended along the back of the racket. This grip is less common but it gives you more power on your shots.

How Do You Grip a Table Tennis Bat?

When it comes to table tennis, there are two main ways to grip your bat – the shakehands grip and the penhold grip. The shakehands grip is by far the most popular way to hold a table tennis bat, and is used by the vast majority of professional players. This grip gets its name from the fact that you essentially shake hands with your bat when using it – your palm will be facing downwards and your thumb and first finger will be wrapped around the rubber on either side of the blade.

To get a good shakehands grip, start by holding your bat in front of you with the handle running horizontally across your palm. Then, place your thumb on one side of the handle and wrap your fingers around so that they rest on top of your thumb. Your index finger should be pointing towards the blade, while your other fingers should be curled inwards towards your palm.

Once you have this basic shape, adjust your grip until you feel comfortable – some people like to have their index finger resting right on top of the blade while others prefer to have it slightly further back. You can also experiment with how tightly you hold onto the bat – some players like a loose grip while others prefer a tighter one. The penhold grip is much less common than the shakehands grip, but is still used by some professional players (most notably those from China).

This grips gets its name from the fact that it resembles holding a pen or pencil – as such, it is sometimes also known as ‘the Chinese Grip’. To hold a bat using this method, start by placing the rubber end of the handle vertically in front of you so that it’s pointing upwards. Then, place your little finger at the bottom of the handle and curl your other fingers around so that they’re resting on top of it.

Your thumb should then be placed on top of these fingers (or underneath them if you’re left-handed), forming a sort of ‘claw’ shape. Again, adjust until you feel comfortable and experiment with different levels of tightness inyour grip. One important thing to note about gripping a table tennis bat is that you should always try to keepyour wrist firm – if possible, avoid letting it collapse down into a fully pronated position as this will significantly reduce power and control when hitting balls.

Instead, aim to keepa slight bend inyour wrist sothatitremains relatively straight even when holding ontothebat (this can take some practice!).

What are the Different Ways to Hold a Ping Pong Paddle?

There are three different ways to hold a ping pong paddle: the shakehand grip, the penhold grip, and the reverse penhold grip. The shakehand grip is the most common way to hold a ping pong paddle. To do this, you simply extend your arm and open your hand as if you were going to shake someone’s hand.

Then, place the paddle in your hand so that it rests on your fingers and thumb. The blade of the paddle should be pointing up, away from your palm. Your index finger and thumb should be gripping the rubber part of the paddle, while your other fingers should be curled around the handle.

The penhold grip is used by players who come from a background in tennis or table tennis. To do this grip, hold the paddle like you would a pen or toothbrush – with only your index finger and thumb gripping it from underneath. The rest of your fingers should be wrapped around above the blade.

This gives you more control over spin shots, but less power behind your strokes. The reverse penhold grip is similar to the regular penhold grip, but reversed. In this grip, you will again hold the paddle with only your index finger and thumb – but this time they will both be gripping from above instead of below.

This gives you more power behind your strokes but makes it harder to generate spin shots.

How Do Chinese Hold Table Tennis Bats?

The Chinese way of holding a table tennis bat is quite different from the way players from other countries hold their bats. The Chinese way is often referred to as the “penhold” grip, because it is similar to the way one would hold a pen or pencil. To grip the bat using the Chinese method, you place your index finger and thumb on either side of the handle so that they form a circle.

Then, you tuck your middle, ring and pinky fingers underneath the handle. This may seem like an awkward way to hold a bat at first, but with a little practice it will start to feel natural. One advantage of using the Chinese grip is that it gives you more control over your shots.

This is because all of your fingers are in contact with the handle, giving you more dexterity and precision when striking the ball. Additionally, this grip allows for quick changes in direction and spin, making it ideal for players who like to keep their opponents guessing. If you’re thinking about trying out the Chinese way of holding a table tennis bat, go ahead and give it a shot!

With a little practice you’ll be hitting shots that will make your opponents think twice about taking you on.

How To Hold a Table Tennis Bat | PingSkills

Conclusion

You may not give much thought to how you hold your table tennis racket, but it can have a big impact on your game. The way you grip the racket will affect your stroke and the speed and spin of the ball. There are three main ways to hold a table tennis racket: the shakehands grip, the penhold grip, and the V-grip.

The shakehands grip is by far the most popular grip among professional players. It gets its name from the fact that you shake hands with the racket, with your palm facing down. This grip gives you good control over all strokes and is suitable for both forehand and backhand play.

The penhold grip is most commonly used by players from Asia. The racket is held like a pen, with your thumb and first two fingers wrapped around the handle. This grip allows for more wrist movement, giving extra spin to shots played close to the table.

Penhold players often use an inverted (or “pimpled”) rubber on their backhand side so they can generate more spin on that stroke. The V-grip is similar to the shakehands grip, but with your index finger extended along the underside of the racket handle. This gives you more power on strokes played away from the table, but less control than a shakehands or penhold grip.